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Academic Dishonesty Policy

 

Controversial Issues & Topics

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  UMS Defined
  Classical Education Defined
  UMS Guidelines
  UMS Parental Role
  UMS Responsibilities
  UMS vs. Traditional Prep
 
 
     
    CLPS Student Handbook
     
   

Please reference the text below for official Christian Life Preparatory School rules and regulations.

     
    General Information:
    Our Purpose
Our Philosophy
Statement of Faith
Non-Denominational Position
Non-Discrimination Policy
Major Aims and Objectives
Parental Roles
     
    Our Purpose
     
   
  • To partner with parents to develop spiritual maturity in each student
  • To provide each student with an opportunity for academic excellence through college preparatory courses
  • To allow ample opportunity for ministry in the community
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    Our Philosophy
     
   

SPIRITUAL MATURITY
obtained by...

  • Faith in Jesus Christ (2 Peter 1:1-8)
  • Daily Bible reading to learn about Jesus and build faith (Acts 17:11)
  • Parents and teachers guiding students to build integrity, obedience and love for God and His laws (Deut. 4:9, 6:7, 11:19, 32:46, Ps. 78:5)
  • Expression of worship, praise, and thankfulness towards God (Ps. 8:2)
  • Awareness of a purpose and plan by God for each individual (Jer. 29:11; Ps. 139:13,14)

ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE
achieved by...

  • Understanding that God gives the ability to reason, think critically, and excel in learning (Dan. 1: 17)
  • A classical approach to history, literature, grammar, and science
  • Proven mathematical methods and scientific experimentation
  • Enrichment of learning with music, art, computer literacy, and foreign languages
  • Strengthening self-discipline and character through athletic and character development programs
  • Parents and Teachers equipped to cultivate gifts and strengthen weaknesses

COMMUNITY SERVICE
to demonstrate...

  • Christian compassion (Luke 4:18)
  • Sharing the good news of Jesus (Mark 16:15,16)
  • Love of neighbor through good works (Mark 12:31; Eph. 2:8-10)
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    Statement of Faith
     
   

THE BIBLE

  • The Bible is God's infallible word that reveals God's will and purpose for mankind (2 Pe. 1: 21; 1 Th. 2:13).
  • Every word in the Bible is inspired by God and is the ultimate authority for living a fulfilled life
  • (2 Tim. 3:16; 1 Co. 2:13).

GOD

  • There is only one God who has revealed Himself in three persons- the Father, the Son (Jesus Christ), and the Holy Spirit (Jn. 15:26; Ga. 4:6).
  • God is the Creator and in control of all things (Ge. 1; Ne. 9:6; Ps. 24:1,2; 33:6,7,9)

JESUS

  • Jesus Christ is the Son of God, born of a virgin (Mt. 1:20; Lu. 1:35), sinless and perfect (He. 4:15; 1 Pe. 2:22; 2 Co. 5:21; Jn. 8:45,46).
  • Jesus taught the truth and demonstrated the power of God in miracles (Mt. 9:12; Mk. 1,5,6,7; Lu. 4,5,6,8; Jn. 2,4,9,11).
  • Jesus died on a cross (Jn. 19:1-3,16-18) to atone for man's sins, rose from the dead (Lu. 24:39; Ac. 10:40,41; Mt.
    27:62-66; Mk. 16, Lu. 24), and ascended into heaven (Lu. 24:50,51; Ac. 1:9-11).
  • By His death and resurrection, Jesus has cleansed from sin (Ac. 13:38) those who repent of their sins (Ep.1: 7) and believe that Jesus is Lord and Savior (John 3:16; Ro. 10:13; Ac. 4:12).
  • After salvation, a relationship with the Father is restored through faith in Jesus Christ his Son, faith increases (Ro. 8:3,4; Ph. 3:9; Ep. 2:8,9) and an abundant life filled with the fruit of the Spirit follows (Ga. 5:22,23).

THE HOLY SPIRIT

  • The Holy Sprit indwells the believer and gives the enabling power of God (Ac. 9:31) to live a holy life, to overcome sin, to understand the Bible (I Co. 2: 10), and to do the will of God (Jn. 14:26).
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    Non-Denominational Position
 
   

Christian Life Preparatory School's Statement of Faith is fundamental to basic Christian tenets and contains those doctrines to which we unreservedly adhere and teach. It is our desire to maintain this position and to do so in all fairness to each family. It is necessary, therefore, that parents, students, staff, and school board members recognize that the
following areas are to be left to the teaching of home and church:

  1. Church government authority
  2. Time and mode of baptism
  3. Security of the believer
  4. Timing of future events
  5. Second work of grace-baptism of the Holy Spirit
  6. Sinless perfection
  7. Gifts of the Spirit-tongues, interpretation of tongues, healing, miracle working, discerning of spirits. In honoring this desire concerning the outreach of this ministry, there shall be no attempt made by parents, students, staff, or school board members to promote or disparage any doctrinal or denominational beliefs, practices, or positions
    regarding issues upon which the ministry itself has assumed no official stance. We desire to remain united in the salvation and love of Christ, avoiding the dissension which may be caused by denominational distinctives.
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    Non-Discrimination Policy
 
    Christian Life Preparatory School admits students of any race, color, and national or ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, and activities generally accorded or made available to its students and does not discriminate on the basis of race in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, and athletic and other school administered programs.
 
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    Major Aims and Objectives
 
   

First Aim
Our first and most important aim at Christian Life Preparatory School is to glorify and honor God in all that we do (1 Cor. 10:31, 1 Pet. 4:11).

Related Objectives:

  1. We will strive to consistently acknowledge, both in word and deed, the scriptures as our highest rule and final authority for faith and practice in all matters.
  2. We will strive to be in constant and whole-hearted submission to the scriptures in all aspects of school operations in general and the academic program in particular.

Second Aim
Our second aim at Christian Life Preparatory School is to do all that we do, including academic teaching, in such a way that we train and encourage the students the Lord brings under our tutelage to become His disciples (Matt. 28:18-20).

Related Objectives:

  1. We will encourage parents, whenever we have opportunity, to see their highest calling and their most fundamental responsibility as that of training their children to be faithful Disciples of Christ.
  2. We will uphold the Bible as the inspired Word of God and encourage our students to adopt attitudes of love, respect, and appreciation toward both the Holy Scriptures and the One who gave them to us.
  3. We will teach and encourage our students to develop and apply a God-centered perspective to all that they do.
  4. We will strive to avoid doing anything that might distract or discourage students from devotion to the Lord JesusChrist.
  5. We will challenge our students, their families, and fellow staff members to become progressively more knowledgeable of and obedient to the will of God as revealed in the Holy Scriptures.
  6. We will encourage in our students, both through instruction and policy, the development of self-discipline and responsibility based on respect for and submission to God and all other legitimately constituted authority.

Third Aim
As a University-Model School, we will strive to strengthen the family (as the Word defines it), as the first and primary social and educational unit instituted by God, through the educational ministry God has given us (Gen. 2:18-25, Ex. 20:12, Matt. 19:4-6, Eph. 5:22-6:4).

Related Objectives:

  1. In all that we do, we will strive to demonstrate respect for the God-given authority of the parents.
  2. We will encourage parents to fully accept their responsibility for training their children toward godliness and preparing them for life.
  3. We will seek to involve the parents as much as possible, within the general policy guidelines of the school, in all aspects of their child's academic instruction.
  4. We will strive to affirm, through our institutional structure and the nature of the services we provide, the comprehensive responsibility of the parents and the correspondingly limited responsibility of the school in all matters relating to their child's education.

Fourth Aim
In order that our students keep "increasing in wisdom and stature, and in favor with God and men," we aim to provide them with a high quality academic education (Luke 2:52, Prov. 1:2-7, 3:13-20, 4:1-9, 9:9, 10:14).

Related Objectives:

  1. We will promote and strive to adhere to high academic standards.
  2. We will focus our instructional time and attention on fundamental academic content and skills.
  3. In our curriculum design and teaching practices we will emphasize the acquisition and application of critical and creative thinking skills as well as the acquisition of crucial data and mastery of important concepts.
  4. We will seek to develop and implement increasingly effective instructional methodologies.
  5. We will help and encourage our students to understand that all truth is God's truth by integrating the Word with the content of the various subject areas and by demonstrating, when possible, the fundamental connections between the various subject areas.
  6. We will teach and encourage the use of good study habits among our students.
  7. We will train our students how to engage in independent study and research.
  8. We will strive to offer a balanced treatment of the arts, humanities, and sciences.

Fifth Aim
Inasmuch as both the home and the body of Christ share the responsibility for teaching His children, we aim to effectively and systematically integrate the home and the school in the delivery of an academic education (Eph. 4:7-16, 6:4, 1 Cor. 14:26-33, Titus 1:5).

Related Objectives:

  1. We will seek to develop both curricular designs and instructional methodologies that effectively utilize and integrate the various educational resources, including the parent as teacher and tutor, of both the home and the school.
  2. We will seek to establish clear guidelines defining the relationship between the home and the school as educational institutions.
  3. We will seek to establish curricular guidelines defining the responsibilities of and relationship between the classroom instructor and the home instructor in all courses.
     
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Parental Roles
 
   

Parental Roles

Primary Teacher Grades K through 2
The kindergarten through second grade years provide a foundation for academic success. The student will learn to read fluently with comprehension and master basic math facts and function. Therefore, the parent will spend much of the at-home time listening to reading and reviewing math facts and concepts. The parent must be fully committed to time with the student.

Co-Teacher Grades 2 through 4
Responsibilities are divided between the classroom teacher and the parent-teacher at home. The parent reviews concepts covered in class and makes time for memory work practice.
English and math require the most study time in the early to middle elementary grades.

Private Tutor Grades 5 through 7
Courses involving this role are made successful because each student has a private tutor, the parent, willing and ready to assist. Parents will receive instructions from the classroom teacher on a regular basis outlining homework assignments, follow-up study over covered material, and any preparation or review needed for their next class.

Guide for Dependent Study Grades 8 through 10
Courses at this level will begin to cover subject matter that is unfamiliar to many parents. The student is at a dependent age where disciplined study habits are still being formed and must be developed through positive encouragement by the parent. The student will be challenged with consequences for personal choices. The teacher is dependent upon the
parents to make certain that their son or daughter keeps up with the course material assigned and to communicate to the teacher if difficulties should arise. Private tutoring might even be necessary.

Guide to Independent Study Grades 11 & 12
The parents have the opportunity to monitor the independent school work performed by their children while it is still possible for them to provide additional guidance if needed. Courses offered by CLPS at this level will mimic that of a Jr. College program where independent study skills and disciplined planning for completing homework assignments are necessary.

Course Monitor
Some courses will involve equipment or expertise which necessitate that teaching be done in the classroom and leaves little for the parents to teach at home. This role will require the least amount of time by the parent but its importance cannot be understated. The primary responsibility of the parents is to track the progress of their son or daughter and to monitor how well they are doing. Are they becoming discouraged? Are they enjoying the class? What are the activities being done each day in class? What are they learning? In short, parents need to show an interest and express this to their children. If problems should develop, then the teacher needs to know immediately.

Project Assistant
Parent involvement is needed, but not on a regular basis. This role is in many respects similar to that of the "course monitor," but at one or more times during the semester, help at home or at school might be needed in support of a particular project. Drama courses, for example, might involve additional help for student costuming, making puppets, working on sets, etc.

The Encourager
This role by the parent usually involves high school athletes. In a competitive high school athletic program, conditioning training and work on individual skills goes beyond the expertise of most parents. As a result, parents are instead required to actively support their children through regular attendance at games and even at practices. Parents are also encouraged to show their support by participating as volunteers for the school's athletic programs. At a time when older students are beginning to increase their time away from home as they move gradually toward independence, high school athletics offers parents a regular avenue through which to remain an active part of their child's life and interests.

     
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    Academic Policy:
    Academic Emphasis
Levels of Instruction
Class Credits
Grading Standards
Graduation Requirements
Final Exam Exemption Policy
Extra-Curricular Participation
Academic Standing
Guidelines for Transfer Credit
Full-Time v. Part-Time Status
Adding & Dropping Courses
Absences
Late Work Policy
Late Work Due to Absences
Tardies & Course Grades
Auditing of Classes
     
    Academic Emphasis
    The primary purpose of our school's existence is, of course, to deliver an academic education in a manner that enhances the whole process of discipleship. Thus, it is critically important that every class be utilized in such a way that the students are provided with and encouraged to make maximum use of worthwhile learning opportunities. All planned instructional activities should have a clear academic purpose and be in harmony, in terms of both content and format, with the school's basic educational purposes, as defined by policy and curriculum guidelines.
     
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    Levels of Instruction
     
   

The classical method of education is a three stage approach to instruction with the goal of producing students who can apply knowledge and think independently. Students taught using the classical approach can be characterized as creative, inventive, and thoughtful problem solvers. They are capable of logical debate and meaningful expository writing.

The three part approach of classical education is known as the Trivium which consists of the grammar, logic, and rhetoric stages. These three parts of the Trivium can also be synonymously described as knowledge, understanding and wisdom. Grammar (knowledge) is the first and developmental stage of the Trivium which covers the core subjects of math,
science, history, and English, and also includes art, music, Latin, and methods of logical analysis as a foundation for learning. During the Elementary years, students in the grammar stage accumulate and memorize information about each subject while forming a knowledge base to be used in the second and third stages of instruction, logic and rhetoric.
During Jr. High School (logic stage), students synthesize this foundational information to reason, realize principles and gain an overall understanding about each subject. At the High School level (rhetoric stage), students utilize the accumulation of knowledge and understanding through wise expression and communication skills both written and oral.

Adapted from Classical and Christian Education by Gregg Strawbridge

     
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Class Credits
 
   

In general, 6 CLPS credits are equivalent to a full year's instruction in a given course of study. Students will earn course credits on a semester-by-semester basis. The Fall and Spring semesters for CLPS will normally be scheduled for 17 weeks of instruction.

Variance: A variance to this requirement may be granted by the administration to a properly enrolled student when that student has been unable to meet the attendance requirements of the course or courses in which he or she is properly enrolled due to circumstances beyond the family's control (such as an extended illness), provided that the student has, in the judgment of the CLPS instructor overseeing his or her work, achieved minimum mastery of the course content, as defined by the relevant school and

     
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Grading Standards
 
   

Courses at CLPS are graded on a scale of 0-100. The course grade itself represents a percentage of content mastery, which is then used to determine the grade point average (0 - 4.0) of individual courses. The earned grade points are then multiplied by the number of credits earned for the course to determine the earned course grade points, and the sum of all
course grade points is divided by the sum of all credits attempted to obtain the semester and later Cumulative GPA (Grade Point Average). The letter grade equivalents of this system are as follows:

0-100 Scale
Letter Grade Earned
Earned Grade Points
90-100
A
4.0
80-89
B
3.0
70-79
C
2.0
0-69
F
0

Other grades recognized by CLPS are I (incomplete), W (Withdrawal, before the end of the first eight weeks of classes) WP or WF (Withdrew Passing or Failing, after the first eight weeks of class) and T (Transfer Credit). For classes repeated at CLPS a grade of NG (No Grade) will be applied to the class with lowest earned grade. Both attempts for taking the class will be recorded on the transcript. Grades of I, W, WP, WF, T, or NG are not calculated into the student's GPA.

Each course instructor will define specific criteria for assessing grades. All such criteria must honor any standards, requirements or limitations imposed by curriculum guides and other relevant policies for the establishment of grading criteria within a given course.

All class assignments will be graded and returned to the student within one week after the student has turned in the assignment.

     
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Graduation Requirements
 
   

Christian Life Preparatory School offers two diploma plans: the Standard Graduate Diploma and the Honors Graduate Diploma.

  • In order to receive the above diplomas, all candidates must register for and successfully complete on campus a minimum of 5 courses (30 CLPS credits) during their senior year (3 courses must be academic core courses).
    Alternatively, students may take a minimum of 4 courses (24 CLPS credits) their junior and senior years (3 courses must be academic core courses).
  • A student must attend CLPS for their junior and senior years in order to be named the class valedictorian or salutatorian.
  • A student must pursue the Honors Graduate Diploma in order to be named the class valedictorian or salutatorian.
  • Students must maintain an average of 70% or above, and must submit scores from either the ACT or the SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test), as well as complete the course requirements which apply to their specific Diploma
    Plan.

The Standard Graduate Diploma is intended to prepare students for entry into more competitive four-year colleges and universities.

The Honors Graduate Diploma is intended not only to prepare students for entry into more competitive four-year colleges and universities but also to provide them with greater depth and knowledge in three or more selected fields of study.

  • Honors students must take Algebra 1 in 8th grade in order to take Calculus during their senior year.
  • All junior and senior level courses used to satisfy the requirements for earning an honors diploma must be taken at CLPS.
  • To receive an Honors Graduate Diploma, a student must maintain an average of 80% or above and must be in good academic standing.

An academic advisor will create an individual diploma plan for each student as they enter High School at CLPS.

Community/Ministry Service Requirements for Graduation

To fulfill the graduation requirements for CLPS, each student must complete the following community/ministry service activities:

  • A minimum of 6 hours of community/ministry service per semester enrolled is required for graduation. (2 hours must be through a school-sponsored event)
  • All other hours must be presented to the character dean for approval and must meet the following criteria:
    • The service hours must be completed under supervision of an adult who will complete the appropriate documentation (This can be a parent).
    • The service hours must be pre-approved by the character dean.
    • The service hours must be completed through a church or other organization, which provides community/ministry services.
    • The service hours must meet a specific need outside of the home church of the student.
  • All service hours must be properly documented and turned into the character dean within 2 weeks of completing the hours.
  • The character dean will keep the documentation on file. It is the student/parent responsibility to keep up with number of hours completed.

Requirements for Graduation with Character Distinction

  • A minimum of 12 hours of community/ministry service per semester enrolled of which 4 hours must be through a school sponsored event.
  • Hours must reflect a diversity of ministry needs and at the same time a developed relationship with a specific type of ministry area.
  • A total of 4 weeks of mission trips-one of which is completed through a school-sponsored event. Non-school sponsored events must be pre-approved through the character dean.
  • Student must submit 4 teacher recommendations, 1 of which must be a former teacher.
  • Student must be interviewed by the character dean during the fall semester of the senior year.
  • Student must submit an essay on a topic requested by the character dean after the fall interview.
  • Student must file intent for Graduation with Character Distinction at time of registration for the fall semester of their senior year.
     
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Final Exam Exemption Policy
 
   

If a student is eligible to receive high school credit for a course, the student may be exempt from the final exam under the following conditions:

  1. No zeros on record for the course
  2. Less than three absences during the semester
  3. Less than three tardies during the semester
  4. Test average must be above 90%

This policy will be administered at the discretion of the teacher.

     
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Extra-Curricular Participation
 
   

To participate in sports or extra-curricular activities, students must maintain a grade above 70% for each class during each semester. Eligibility may be withdrawn for students exhibiting poor conduct.

     
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Academic Standing
 
   

Students must achieve a GPA of 2.00 or above each semester in attendance at Christian Life Preparatory School in order
to remain in good academic standing. A student whose GPA falls below 2.00 during any given semester may, at the
discretion of the faculty and administration, be given the opportunity to regain good academic standing by being placed on
scholastic probation for the following semester. A student placed on scholastic probation must earn a GPA of at least
2.00 the following semester to return to good academic standing. If a student should earn a GPA less than 2.00 for two
consecutive semesters, he may be blocked from further enrollment in classes at CLPS.

Any class that a student fails must be successfully repeated before the student will be allowed to continue enrolling in the course sequence in which the student earned the failing grade. If he then successfully completes the course at CLPS, the passing grade earned will absolve the failing grade, which will be struck from the transcript. When a failing grade has been absolved in this manner, both attempts at taking the course will be noted on the transcript, but only the passing grade will be recorded, and only the passing attempt will affect the GPA. On the transcript, the failing grade of an absolved failed course will be replaced with NG (No Grade). However, a student's total transcript results will be used to determine school valedictorians, salutatorians and highest GPA awards.

Students may complete a failed class in another academic setting, such as another school or a homeschool. In this case, students must request transfer credit through the usual channels following the successful completion of the course, should they desire to have the course credit recognized by CLPS. If such credit is granted, it will absolve the failing grade on the student's transcript; however, both attempts will be noted, and neither the original failed course nor the transferred credit will be calculated into the student's GPA. Any student, including one who has been granted transfer credit, must take an entrance test to be able to enroll in any course for which entrance testing is required, unless he hassuccessfully
completed the previous course at CLPS in the course sequence.

     
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Guidelines for Transfer Credit
 
   

Christian Life Preparatory School accepts application for transfer credit from any student who is currently enrolled at CLPS or who is entering CLPS for the first time. A Transfer Credit Application (available from the front office) must be reviewed and approved by the Academic Advisor before credit will be granted. Simply turning in an application for transfer credit does not ensure approval. Please review the three different procedures for acceptance of transfer credit, and submit an application accordingly. The class submitted for transfer credit must be equivalent in content, level, and rigor offered by Christian Life Preparatory School.

  1. Students Transferring credits from an accredited high school
    1. The student must have a final grade of 70% or higher.
    2. Submit an official transcript from the school where the student received the actual credits.
  2. Students Transferring credits from a private unaccredited high school or informal setting with a paid Instructor
    1. An official grade report must be submitted. The student must have a final grade of 70% or higher.
    2. The student must have used a standard high school level textbook. (Please note that a fill-in-the-blank workbook approach will not be acceptable.)
    3. Submit the results of closed book tests or essays, completed projects, research papers, etc.
    4. The results of an end-of-course cumulative exam must be submitted. A grade of 70% or higher is required for transfer credit approval.
    5. The student must have received an equivalent amount of time with the instructor as a student who is enrolled in a CLPS course would. For example, a student who is enrolled for a one 3 credit-bearing course will receive 48 hours of instruction time from the instructor. Therefore, in order to receive 6 credits for any one complete course (first and second semester), a student must receive 96 hours of instruction time. Instruction time does not include the time spent on homework and/or projects. One credit is equivalent to 16 hours of instruction. Two credits are equivalent to 32 hours of instruction. Time expectations may vary depending on whether the course is academic, fine arts, elective, P.E., etc.
  3. Students Applying for credits from home-school instruction
    1. The student must have a final grade of 70% or higher.
    2. The student must have used a standard high school level textbook. (Please note that a fill-in-the-blank workbook approach will not be acceptable.)
    3. Submit the results of closed book tests or essays, completed projects, research papers, etc.
    4. The results of an end-of-course cumulative exam must be submitted. A grade of 70% or higher is required for transfer credit approval.
    5. The student must have received an equivalent amount of time with the instructor as a student who is enrolled in a CLPS course would. For example, a student who is enrolled for a one 3 credit-bearing course will receive 48 hours of instruction time from the instructor. Therefore, in order to receive 6 credits for any one complete course (first and second semester), a student must receive 96 hours of instruction time. Instruction time does not include the time spent on homework and/or projects. One credit is equivalent to 16 hours of instruction. Two credits are equivalent to 32 hours of instruction. Time expectations may vary depending on whether the course is academic, fine arts, elective, P.E., etc.
    6. A final exam or research paper must be submitted. CLPS reserves the right to request additional documentation for the course. In the event that a student does not have the required final exam(s) and/or research paper the following methods may be used to transfer credit:
      1. A student may demonstrate mastery of the material of an earlier level of math, English, or a foreign language by successfully passing a CLPS entrance exam and at least one semester of work with a grade of C or better. (For example, if a student passes the entrance exam to Algebra II and makes at least a C in Pre-Calculus the first semester then the transfer credit for Pre-Calculus would be accepted.)
      2. CLPS may decide to develop comprehensive exams for subjects such as History and Science. Upon successful completion of these exams a student would receive credit.
      3. Under the direction of a teacher in the department from which a course for credit is being requested, a student may write a comprehensive research paper over the required subject. This paper would then be reviewed by the department chair, who would then make the decision if the student had grasped the appropriate amount of knowledge from the previous course. Please note that CLPS will make the decision as to which method of approval will be used.
     
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Full-Time v. Part-Time Status
 
    To receive full-time designation, a student must be enrolled in 4 or more classes.
     
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Adding & Dropping Courses
 
    Courses must be added to a student's initial registration before the close of registration for each semester. A student may drop a course in any given semester without having the dropped course affect the student's GPA. Courses dropped during the first eight weeks of classes will be given a grade of W. Courses dropped after the first eight weeks but before the end of the first twelve weeks of classes will receive a grade of WP (Withdrew Passing) or WF (Withdrew Failing). Courses dropped after the first twelve weeks of classes will receive a grade for the course in accordance with the standard course grading system. Students who withdraw completely from CLPS may, at the discretion of the administration, receive grades of I (incomplete) for all courses dropped at the time of withdrawal.
     
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Absences
 
    Students must regularly attend classes in order to successfully complete a course. A student must be present for 85% of the scheduled class days to receive credit for the class. A student attending a class 3 days a week for 17 weeks cannot miss more than 8 days of class. A student attending a class 2 days a week for 17 weeks cannot miss more than 5 days of class. For any student with more than 5 absences on MWF or 3 absences on TTH in a class for a semester, the final course grade will be reduced by five points. Whenever possible, arrangements for making up work should be made with the teacher prior to the absence. Students arriving to class more than fifteen (15) minutes late will be counted as absent.
     
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Late Work Policy
 
   

Whoever loves discipline loves knowledge, but he who hates correction is stupid. (Prov. 12:1)
Diligent hands will rule, but laziness ends in slave labor. (Prov. 12:24)
But the fruit of the Spirit is . . . self-control, against such things there is no law. (Gal. 5:22-23)

Christian Life Preparatory School, desiring to promote both godly character qualities and high academic standards, has adopted the following general principles concerning student assignments turned in late. These principles are designed to promote the development of godly character qualities such as self-discipline, diligence, and self-control in the lives of our students and to give all faculty members a framework within which they may formulate their individual class policies.

A grade penalty will be assessed for any work turned in late. Late work will be graded according to the following policy:

  1. Work turned in any time after the beginning of the class period will be considered late.
  2. 1 Class Day Late: 10 point grade penalty
  3. 2 Class Days Late: 30 point grade penalty
  4. After 2 Class Days Late: No credit for the assignment.
     
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Late Work Due to Absences
 
    Arrangements for making up late work due to absences shall be made between the teacher and the parent.
     
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Tardies & Course Grades
 
    The final course grade will be reduced by one point for every two tardies a student accumulates in any given class. Thus the second and third tardies will result in a one-point reduction, the fourth and fifth tardies in a two-point reduction, and so forth. Parents will be contacted for a conference when a student exceeds 5 tardies.
     
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Auditing of Classes
 
    Christian Life Preparatory School does not allow the auditing of classes. Any student enrolled in any class at CLPS will receive a grade reflecting his level of achievement in the class.
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    Academic Dishonesty Policy:
    Definitions
Enforcement
     
Significance and Purpose
One of the major goals of Christian Life Preparatory School is to aid parents in making disciples of the students admitted to the school. We also wish to provide our students with a high quality academic education, in terms of real spiritual, intellectual, and emotional growth. This demands that we require our students and their parents to adhere to high standards of personal integrity, and provide corrective disciplinary action when they fail to do so. Academic dishonesty in any form is both a serious breach of personal integrity and a serious hindrance to real student learning. CLPS has developed this policy, which is intended to curb and, when necessary, correct academic dishonesty.
     
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Definitions
 
   

1. General: Academic dishonesty is broadly defined as any attempt on the part of a student or parent to falsely represent
the student's level of achievement or mastery in a given course.
This includes:

  1. Claiming or indicating in any form or fashion that the student has fulfilled any assignment or other academic responsibility, such as reading assigned texts or engaging in assigned study, when in fact he has not done so,
  2. Using any assistance to copy the work of other students, to complete quizzes, tests, or examinations without the direct and explicit authorization of the course instructor,
  3. Using any resources, solution manuals or teacher edition textbooks, other than those authorized by the course instructor to write papers, prepare reports, solve problems, or complete other course assignments,
  4. Obtaining quizzes, tests, examinations, or other academic materials or evaluation instruments created by or belonging to an instructor, other staff member, or the school itself, including materials properly used and in the possession of students currently or previously enrolled in the course, without the explicit authorization of the course instructor,
  5. Engaging in plagiarism, which includes "the knowing or negligent use by paraphrase or direct quotation of the published or unpublished work of another person without full and clear acknowledgment" and "the knowing or negligent unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency" which customarily sells or offers free of charge term papers or other academic materials,
  6. Altering a graded paper or project for the purpose of disputing the accuracy of the grade, and
  7. Collaborating without explicit authorization with another student or students during any quiz, test, or examination or in the fulfillment of any other academic assignment or responsibility.

2. Specific: The following guidelines define CLPS's standard application of the general definition given above to:

  1. quizzes, tests, and other examinations,
  2. homework
  3. major papers and projects

Individual course instructors may grant exceptions to these guidelines, but must do so explicitly, as indicated by the relevant policy statements given below. Any academic assignments which, by their nature, are not addressed by these guidelines, will be governed by whatever guidelines are provided by the course instructor with regard to such an assignment.

  1. Quizzes, tests, and other examinations: all quizzes, tests, and other examinations, whether conducted in the classroom or in some other location, must be taken at a single sitting and without outside assistance of any sort, including but not limited to books, notes, other individuals, reference works, and audio or visual media. Any exception to these guidelines must be given in writing by the instructor on assignment sheets, the evaluation instrument itself, or other written instructions disseminated to all of the students in the class.
  2. Homework: homework should be done by the student alone and without assistance of any sort, including but not limited to information provided in teacher edition textbooks, unless such assistance is authorized, either orally or in writing by the instructor in the course, or by the catalogue or an approved curriculum guide's description of parent role for the course. The course instructor may grant such authorization, either in conjunction with the giving of the assignment or in response to student requests, at any time and for any duration to all of the students in the class or to selected students only, provided that the instructor feels it is in the best educational interests of the student(s) receiving such authorization.
  3. Major papers and projects: major papers and projects should be completed only by the student or by the members of a student group constituted by the instructor for the purpose of completing the paper or project in question without other assistance of any sort, except as explicitly authorized by the instructor. This authorization may be articulated either orally or in writing when granted in the classroom directly under the supervision of the instructor but must be given in writing on assignment sheets or other written instructions disseminated to all of the students in the class when granted for work to be completed outside of the classroom setting.
     
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Enforcement
 
   

1. Discovery and Determination of Academic Dishonesty: Determination of academic dishonesty may be made by the instructor of the course in which it was deemed to have been committed. Other school officials, including proctors or other instructor substitutes, may alert the instructor to the possibility of academic dishonesty should they acquire or become aware of credible evidence, including but not limited to eye witness observations, which indicate that cheating, plagiarism, or other dishonest acts have taken place. Once the instructor has determined that academic dishonesty has indeed taken place, he shall inform the student(s) of his finding and, in conjunction with the relevant school officials, shall impose the proper penalties as described below.
2. Appeals Process: Should a student desire to appeal the determination of the course instructor, he must request in writing a hearing with the principal, who will arrange for a conference with the student, one or both parents (or guardians), and the instructor of the course. During this conference, all relevant evidence will be presented and examined. Following the conclusion of the conference, the principal, or another administrator, should the principal be an original party to the case, will render a determination in the matter based on his assessment of the weight and credibility of whatever evidence is presented for review. Should the student desire to appeal the determination of the principal, he must request in writing a hearing before the Academic Affairs Committee, which shall be chaired by a member other than the principal for the purposes of the hearing. During this hearing, only that evidence that was presented and examined during the previous conference with the principal shall be reviewed; should new evidence having a serious bearing on the matter surface during the hearing, the matter shall be referred back to the principal for a new hearing to be conducted according to the procedures described above. The Academic Affairs Committee shall be responsible for determining the admissibility of any new evidence. Following the conclusion of a hearing before the Academic Affairs Committee, that committee, excluding the principal and any other member who has been a part of
any earlier conferences or discussions regarding the matter, or any member who feels he may have a conflict of interests in the matter, will render a determination in the matter based on its assessment of the weight and credibility of whatever evidence is admitted for consideration. In all cases, the determination of the Academic Affairs Committee will be final. If that committee finds the student guilty of academic dishonesty, it shall impose the proper penalties as described below.
3. Penalties: The primary intentions of the imposition of penalties against students found guilty of academic dishonesty are to (a) act as a deterrent against such conduct, (b) to enhance the integrity of grades awarded by CLPS, and (c) to place pressure on an erring student in the hope of motivating him to abandon this destructive behavior. The penalties are assessed according to the number of occurrences the student has been discovered to be engaged in academic dishonesty over the course of a full academic year (at least two full semesters).

  1. First offense: a first offense will result in (1) a written warning from the teacher to both the student and his parent(s), (2) a grade of zero for the assignment affected by the academic dishonesty, and (3) a written report sent to the campus administration.
  2. Second offense: a second offense will result in (1) a written warning from the principal to both the student and his parent(s), (2) a grade of zero for the assignment affected by the academic dishonesty, (3) a conference
    between the principal and the parent(s) of the student, and (4) a writing assignment for the student, in which he investigates and reports on Biblical instruction regarding honesty and integrity.
  3. Third offense: a third offense will result in a one day suspension from school, in accordance with the guidelines generally applicable to such a suspension, (2) a grade of zero for the assignment affected by the academic dishonesty, (3) placement of the student on scholastic probation, which shall remain in effect until two (2) full regular semesters have passed with no further confirmed incidence of cheating, and (4) removal of all participation privileges for extra-curricular activities, including those unaffected by the school's policies on scholastic probation.
  4. Fourth Offense: a fourth offence will result in expulsion from the school.
NOTE: adapted from the UNT Student Handbook
     
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    Controversial Issues & Topics:
    Introduction
In the World But Not of It
The Great Commission and the Training of Disciples
Training for Warfare
The Instructions
The Model
Principles and Policies
Summary
     
    Introduction
    One area of particular concern for Christian schools is the relationship between sound academic instruction and the treatment of difficult or controversial issues. In order to provide our school community with some common guidelines regarding our school's approach to this matter, the school has officially adopted the following statement defining, in broad terms, the school's stance. Anyone having questions regarding the application of this position to specific classes, lessons, or materials should consult with the administration.
 
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In the World But Not of It
 

In His prayer for His followers, as recorded in the seventeenth chapter of John, Jesus requests of the Father that He keep believers safe in the midst of the enemy territory into which Jesus Himself is going to send them:

I do not pray that You should take them out of the world, but that You should keep them from the evil one. They are not of the world, just as I am not of the world. Sanctify them by Your truth. Your Word is truth. As You sent Me into the world, I also have sent them into the world. I do not pray for these alone, but also for those who will believe in Me through their word. (John 17: 15-18; 20; NKJV)

It is largely from this prayer that the Church has come to understand that it is to be in the world, but not of it. Were it not for the direct intervention of the Father, working through His grace in response to the prayer of His dearly beloved Son, such a goal would be impossible to achieve or maintain; even with divine help it is no small challenge. There are no doubt a number of reasons why the Lord has placed His children in such a difficult circumstance, but there is at least one which bears directly upon one of the fundamental issues involved in bringing up children "in the training and admonition of the Lord" (Eph. 6:4b; NKJV) and so is of tremendous significance to Christian education, both in theory and practice. Specifically, we are referring to the Lord's express desire to build His kingdom through the activity of His disciples.

 
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The Great Commission and the Training of Disciples
 

When we talk about training up a child in the nurture and admonition of the Lord, we are, in essence, talking about making disciples. This, of course, is simply an application of the Great Commission to parenting and education. The Great Commission defines, in large part, the purpose of the Church in the World today: "Go . . . and make disciples of all the nations, . . . teaching them to observe all things that I have commanded you . . . ." (Matt. 28:19, 20; NKJV). If we are to train our children to become true disciples it is necessary that we understand what it is, exactly, God wants to see in a disciple, and what He desires to accomplish through a disciple. If we do not take time to understand His purposes, we will undoubtedly fall far short of the full measure of cooperation that He desires from us as He works in our lives and the lives of our children. And to the degree that we fall short of cooperating with Him as He works toward His goals in discipleship, we are falling short of obeying both the Great Commission and the instructions given us in Ephesians 6.

The main qualities that God desires to see in a disciple are love and loyalty ("baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit"; baptism was and is a sign of deep commitment to a person) and obedience ("teaching them to observe all things that I have commanded you"). This, of course, is the affirmative side of His desire that his children not be of the world. The main work that God desires to accomplish through His disciples is, essentially, spiritual reproduction ("Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations . . . ") and is apparently one of the primary reasons He not only places His children in the world, but actually sends them to the world. Thus a Christian education, if it is to be fully in line with God's Word, must seek to cooperate with Him in producing disciples who do not retreat from the world, nor join in the values of the world, but who are prepared in such a way that they can effectively and triumphantly invade enemy territory and thus aggressively extend the reach of the Kingdom of God into an unbelieving world.

 
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Training for Warfare
 
In practical terms, what this means is that we must train our children for warfare. The world hates both the Lord and His followers (John 15: 18-25; 17: 14), and will do whatever it can in an attempt to destroy both His kingdom and the lives of those who follow Him. Some, in rightly perceiving this hatred, have sought to protect their children from all of the world's malice and wickedness. While such a stance may be understandable in light of parental love, and nobly motivated in a desire to keep their children unstained from the world, it is not conducive to preparing children to be aggressive and effective witnesses to the unbelieving masses of humanity. Others, rightly understanding the need to send their children out as lights into the world, have launched them largely untrained into a highly hostile environment from whence they often come away grievously wounded, if indeed they come away at all. Obviously, neither approach is either satisfactory on practical grounds or in keeping with the purposes of the Lord. Fortunately, our loving Father has, as should be expected, left us many explicit instructions as well as a perfect instructional model regarding the proper approach for preparing His servants for dangerous but effective combat. The instructions, of course, are contained in the Word, and the model is the Word itself. It is upon these instructions and according to this model that Christian Life Preparatory School has sought to formulate a policy designed to help us teach our students skills they can use to have a significant impact upon the unbelieving world without becoming entangled in its values, priorities, or practices.
 
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The Instructions
 
The educational instructions given us in the Word include both normative standards and pedagogical principles. By normative standards we mean standards against which all other beliefs or practices are to be compared and evaluated. Instruction we would classify as normative standards would include all teachings relating to moral absolutes, doctrinal positions, church practices, and so forth. It would go far beyond the purposes of this position statement to enumerate all of the standards of belief and conduct which the Lord has revealed in His Word; sufficient for our present purposes is a frank acknowledgment and acceptance of His Word, and His Word alone, as the source we will employ for evaluating the moral, theological, or practical quality of all with which we come into contact. Instruction regarding the way in which those standards are built into the thinking and lives of our children, on the other hand, we might classify as pedagogical principles, or divinely established means for communicating and instilling God's normative standards to and in our children. These divinely appointed means for communicating the truth of God's Word can largely be summarized as teach constantly and teach completely, treating from a godly perspective all of life's realities, both the good and pleasant and the sinful and ugly.
 
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The Model
 
It is this idea of dealing with not only the good and pleasant but also the sinful and ugly which has often caused a good bit of discomfort to many sincere believers, and which at times has also been a topic of fierce debate among godly Christians on both sides of the issue. Be that as it may, it is impossible to avoid the fact that God's Word, which was intended for the instruction and training of His children, confronts all aspects of life, including a wide range of sins and sinful human passions. For example, when presenting the life of King David, the scriptures treat bluntly and directly not only his admirable qualities but also his adultery, his deception, and his planned murder of an innocent man. Indeed, good and godly principles are often taught using sinful and ugly realities as a point of comparison and contrast (see Hebrews 3 and 4, for example). If we take the wisdom and goodness of God seriously, then we cannot blithely assume that a godly approach to education is one which assiduously avoids dealing with uncomfortable or controversial subjects; to do so would be tantamount to accusing God Himself of ungodliness! Out of respect for the Lord and His Word, then, we must ponder the nature and contents of the exemplary "textbook" He has given us to better understand His approach to instructing His children in matters pertaining to life and godliness.
 
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Principles and Policies
 

Out of respect for the purposes and instructions of the Lord, and for the educational example He has given us, Christian Life Preparatory School recognizes the following principles for treating difficult or controversial topics and adopts the accompanying policy guidelines which we believe faithfully reflect and implement those principles.

Principle 1: One of God's purposes in the training of disciples is to equip them to reach others with the gospel of Jesus Christ and to then teach them to obey all that He has taught us.
Policy Guideline 1: We will not encourage our children to retreat from contact with a sinful world, but rather train them to effectively reach out to unbelievers.

Principle 2: In order to effectively reach others, we must learn to build personal and cultural bridges, to in effect follow in the footsteps of the apostle Paul by "become[ing] all things to all men" (I Cor. 9: 19-23) for the sake of the gospel. This means that our students must develop the ability to understand others and their cultures and thought forms, and to use that understanding for the purpose of effective communication.
Policy Guideline 2: We will engage in the study of other peoples, cultures, and thought forms, including godless cultures and thought forms, so that our students might be better able to understand and so communicate with all the Lord, in His sovereign authority, may bring them into contact.

Principle 3: God explicitly warns His children against becoming worldly in their thought and attitudes. This does not mean that they are to avoid all knowledge or study of difficult, unpleasant, or sinful realities (or indeed they would have to avoid much of the Word itself), but rather that they are to become increasingly proficient in distinguishing between good and evil and increasingly inclined to reject the evil in favor of the good by learning to evaluate all with which they come into contact by the standards and examples contained in the Word of God. By doing so they will develop the ability to reach others without sacrificing those habits of thought, attitude, and conduct that are distinctively Christian and necessary for true obedience to the Lord.
Policy Guideline 3: Whenever they are brought into contact with difficult or controversial realities, students will be taught and encouraged to evaluate and correctly respond to those realities in light of God's Word, so that they may be able to confront the world without becoming stained by the world.

Principle 4: Dealing effectively with difficult and controversial issues and topics generally requires the use of higher order thinking skills, such as analysis and evaluation. Thus these issues and topics can and should be used to develop these skills. Furthermore, the scriptures encourage us to develop wisdom, which includes the exercise and application of higher level thinking skills.
Policy Guideline 4: Teachers will use the pedagogical opportunities presented by the treatment of difficult or controversial issues to challenge their students to develop skills in analysis, evaluation, synthesis, and proper applications, and to apply those skill to godly purposes.

 
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Summary
 
    At Christian Life Preparatory School, we do not intend to shield our students from all of the sin and ugliness inherent in a fallen world, but rather to teach them to confront those realities openly and honestly and, especially, from a God-centered perspective, so that they might be in the world-and have an impact on the world--without becoming of the world. All
disciples, including our students, are and will continue to be engaged in warfare. We believe it is our responsibility to train them under controlled but not unrealistically soft circumstances so that they might be able to take ground for the Kingdom without becoming casualties.
 
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    Student Behavior:
    Student Code of Conduct
Student Discipline Procedures
Disciplinary Action for Major Misconduct
Classroom Management
Classroom Rules and Procedures
     
     
    Student Code of Conduct
 
   

It is by his deeds that a lad distinguishes himself, if his conduct is pure and right. (Proverbs 20:11)

The purpose of CLPS's Code of Conduct is to promote a Christ-like attitude in its learning environment and to encourage the development of positive Christian relationships among its students. Therefore, CLPS has set specific guidelines regarding behavior.

  1. Students should show respect to adults at all times. A title (Mr., Mrs., Coach, etc.) should be used when addressing an adult.
  2. Students should treat each other with respect, kindness, and compassion just as God commands us in Matthew 7:12,"So in everything do to others what you would have them do to you."
  3. The school facility and grounds should be kept clean, orderly, and in a manner that shows an attitude of gratefulness.
  4. There will be no horseplay, running, or rough play during or between classes.
  5. Use of profanity is not permitted.
  6. Public displays of affection between sexes such as handholding, kissing, note passing, etc. are not permitted.
  7. IPODS, MP3 players, CD players, radios, tape players, tapes, or computer discs shall not be brought to school unless specific permission is given by the school administration. Any of the devices listed which are brought to school will be confiscated and returned to the parents. Cell phones are allowed on campus but must remain OFF. Cell phones used or left "ON" while on campus will be confiscated and returned to the parents. Laptop PC's are allowed on campus, but usage will be regulated by individual teachers.
  8. Tobacco products, illicit drugs, alcohol, or weapons are not allowed on campus or at any CLPS sponsored event.
     
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Student Discipline Procedures
 
   

Train up a child in the way he should go, even when he is old he will not depart from it. (Proverbs 22:6)

The keys to discipline are that the child must feel he is loved, that he knows and accepts the boundaries of behavior, and that he sees the proper direction in which to head to avoid repeated wrong decisions. The keys to discipline for a school is that it gives its children support and direction while also working in harmony with the home. The primary goal of the CLPS staff will be to practice "preventative" discipline through the use of good teaching techniques. As the need arises, the school may also employ mild forms of reproof, rebuke, and correction (under no circumstances does CLPS practice spanking or similar forms of corporal punishment) in order to encourage cooperation among the student body. The school will control the impact of serious discipline problems by limiting or withdrawing the participation privileges of consistently uncooperative students. Parents are responsible for dealing with discipline problems of an ongoing or more serious nature. The General Discipline Policy Guidelines to be employed in response to inappropriate student conduct follows below:

1. The instructor will determine the severity of the infraction. Most misconduct is of a relatively mild nature and should be dealt with the least forceful response needed to restore correct behavior and an orderly instructional environment. At this level, the range of appropriate responses available to the instructor is rather narrow, basically consisting of various forms of verbal and non-verbal (and always firm but polite) rebuke and moderate corrective measures (such as a rearrangement in seating or a brief and informal conference after class).
2. Should rebuke or moderate correction fail to bring about the necessary response, or if attempting to correct the student's misconduct would in itself detract from an orderly classroom environment, or if the misbehavior is ongoing or of a more serious nature, then the instructor should remove the uncooperative student from the classroom. This may be done by sending the student to the main office with the appropriate discipline form or by notifying the school office of the problem and requesting that the student be removed. In the latter case, an Administrative Staff Member will quietly remove the child from the class, discuss the problem with the student, and will supervise the student until such time as:

  1. The student can return to class without causing further problems, or
  2. The parent is notified and arrives to discuss the problem directly with the appropriate staff member. Removal of the child for the remainder of the day may be necessary.

Once a student has been removed from class, the administration and the parents assume the main responsibility for correcting the student's misconduct. While he is no longer directly responsible for correcting the student's misbehavior, the classroom teacher is welcome and encouraged to share any concerns or insights he may have regarding the situation. He may also request (or be asked) to participate in a parent-teacher conference, and may be consulted by the administration with regard to any more serious measures to be taken (these measures are discussed in greater detail below, under Discipline Management Tools and Techniques). In all cases, love will be an integral part of the discipline process at CLPS. Discipline is more than control. We consider it to be a vital teaching opportunity.

     
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Disciplinary Action for Major Misconduct
 
   

SUSPENSION
Suspension from all classes and activities can be made with or without permission to make up work. Suspensions can be from one to three consecutive class days. . . . Suspensions may carry with them any number of requirements that the administration deems appropriate. Failure to meet these requirements can extend the duration of the suspension or lead
to expulsion considerations.

EXPULSION
Expulsion may be imposed with or without permission to appeal. All final expulsions must appear on the student's permanent record.

Expulsion Guidelines:

  1. Student is suspended immediately from all classes and activities.
  2. The family's admission agreement with the school is declared null and void.
  3. If the family does not wish to appeal, then the student is no longer a CLPS student and the record of expulsion will appear on the student's transcript.
  4. If the family wishes to appeal, they must submit their formal request for readmission in writing, stating their reasons for wanting to negotiate a new and more restricted admission with the school.
  5. If the formal request is accepted, the student may continue to receive class assignments while the appeal is pending. Both parents and the student must schedule a time to appear before the administration to discuss the appeal.
  6. Re-admittance may only be on the condition that the family obligates itself to a new and revised admission agreement, complete with the administration's required corrective actions, restrictive measures, and future accountabilities. Failure to keep the new agreement can result in automatic forfeiture of the student's admission status with no permission to appeal.
  7. If the new agreement is kept faithfully and without incident, the student may apply to have the record of expulsion deleted from his or her permanent record at the end of that school year or at a later time as deemed appropriate.
     
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Classroom Management
 
   

At CLPS, we will actively reward Christ-like behavior. Teachers will maintain a behavior chart for each student in K through 4th grade.

K - 4th Grade - For each class period
1st Infraction: Verbal Warning: A student will receive one verbal warning for breaking a classroom rule. Their name will be written on the board.
2nd Infraction: No Stamp, E-Mail to Parent: The student will not receive a stamp on the behavior chart for that day and the teacher will e-mail a note to the parents stating the student's offense.
3rd Infraction: The student will be sent to the office and the parents called. One of the parents is expected to come to the school office and discipline the child.

Rewards: Student's will visit a "treasure chest" once they have received enough stamps.

5th-12th Grade - For each class period
1st Infraction: Verbal Warning: A student will receive one verbal warning for breaking a classroom rule. Their name will be written on the board.
2nd Infraction: E-Mail to Parents: The teacher will e-mail a note home to the parents stating the student's offense.
3rd Infraction: The student will be sent to the office and the parents called. One of the parents is expected to come to the school office and discipline the child.

     
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Classroom Rules and Procedures
 
   

At CLPS, the classroom is a place of learning where the teacher is able to teach and the student is able to learn. Conduct that disrupts teaching or learning will not be tolerated. Students should always:

  • Come to class on time and be prepared with all required materials;
  • Conduct themselves in an orderly and respectful manner;
  • Make an effort to learn by participating in class activities and following teacher instructions;
  • Strive to stay on task the entire class period and not engage in activities such as social conversation, grooming, sleeping, or personal note writing;
  • Obey all school rules and regulations (e.g., late work policy, academic honesty, dress code, etc.); and • When in violation of these guidelines, comply with the requests of teachers regarding classroom control and discipline.

Teachers will strive for consistency when administering classroom discipline.

General Rules ("Life Rocks" Posters)

  1. R-Respect 0. 0. 1. Authority. Ephesians 6:1-3
  2. O-Others are Important. Mark 12:31
  3. C-Correction, Accept it and Learn from it. Proverbs 12:1
  4. K-Keep Yourself Prepared. I Peter 1:13
  5. S-Seek Excellence. Colossians 3:23,24

Classroom Procedures

  1. Enter class quietly
  2. Get needed materials
  3. Turn in homework
  4. Begin opening activity or assignment
  5. Raise hand to speak
  6. Stay seated unless given permission to do otherwise
  7. Leave class in an orderly manner when dismissed by the teacher
  8. Discard all trash - Do not throw any trash on the floor
  9. Place chairs neatly under tables
     
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    Student Dress Code:
    Girls Uniform
Girls Athletics:
Boys Uniform
Boys Athletics:
Inappropriate Dress
     
   

Dress Code Policy
At any time during the school day, the purpose of the dress code is to present a positive image and provide an environment conducive to learning. All students are expected to maintain good grooming habits and appropriate dress. Students in violation of the dress code will not be permitted to attend classes until the violation is corrected. Although a student with the violation or offensive clothing may have inadvertently been allowed to attend one or more classes, this does not mean that a student cannot be referred for a dress code violation later in the day. Students must wear a CLPS uniform while on campus and while attending any school activity unless otherwise notified.

 
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Girls Uniform
 
   
  • Plaid Skirt / Skort / Jumper
  • Navy Pants or Navy Skirt
  • Navy Capri Pants (Purchased at Academy Uniform Store Only)
  • White Middy (may be untucked)
  • White Turtleneck or White Oxford (SS or LS)
  • Hunter Green Polo or White Polo (SS or LS)
  • White Socks or White Tights
  • Predominantly Black or White Tennis Shoes
  • Dark Mary Janes (max heel height one inch)
  • Plaid Ties (Optional)
  • Dark Modesty Shorts
  • Hunter Green, White, Black or Navy Sweatshirt (Solid)
  • Hunter Green, White, Black or Navy Sweater or Jacket (Solid)
  • Only a solid white t-shirt may be worn under shirts
     
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    Girls Athletics
     
   
  • Solid Navy Sweatpants or Solid Navy Shorts
  • Solid White Athletic Shirt or Hunter Green, White, Black or Navy Sweatshirt (Solid)
  • White / Green CLPS T-Shirt
     
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Boys Uniform
 
   
  • Khaki Pants or Khaki Shorts
  • Navy Pants or Navy Shorts
  • White Oxford (SS or LS)
  • Hunter Green Polo or White Polo (SS or LS)
  • White / Black / Brown Socks
  • Predominantly Black or White Tennis Shoes
  • Dark Dress Shoes
  • Dark Belt
  • School Logo optional on all shirts
  • Hunter Green, White, Black or Navy Sweatshirt (Solid)
  • Hunter Green, White, Black or Navy Sweater or Jacket (Solid)
  • Only a solid white t-shirt may be worn under shirts
     
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Boys Athletics
 
   
  • Solid Navy Sweatpants or Solid Navy Shorts
  • Solid White Athletic Shirt or Hunter Green, White, Black or Navy Sweatshirt (Solid)
  • White / Green CLPS T-Shirt

All Uniforms may be purchased from:

Academy Uniforms (U.T.W School Uniform)
5021 Granbury Road, Fort Worth, Texas 76133
Hours: Tue-Fri 10-6 Sat 10-2
Phone: (817) 292-5437
http://www.academyuniforms.com

We feel the need to reiterate some items on our school's dress code:

  • Courtesy shorts must be worn under all skirts.
  • Skirts must be mid-kneecap length.
  • Tight-fitting shirts are not allowed.
  • All shirts must be tucked. White Middy may be untucked.
  • Only a solid white t-shirt may be worn under shirts.
  • There will be no shoes allowed with a heel of over one inch.
  • The school logo is optional on all shirts.
Any students in violation will be sent home.
     
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Inappropriate Dress
 
   
  1. Multi-colored clothing, solid colors only.
  2. argo style shorts or pants (outside pockets).
  3. Tight-fitting clothes.
  4. Untucked shirts.
  5. Shoes allowed with a heel over one inch.
  6. Clothing that is torn or has holes.
  7. Clothing with an emblem, insignia, or picture.
  8. Unnatural hair coloring or extreme hair styles.
  9. Tattoos and facial hair.
  10. Hats.

SS = Short Sleeve LS = Long Sleeve

All clothing must be MODEST and in GOOD TASTE to the GLORY OF GOD drawing attention to your face, not to your body.

     
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    Financial Policy:
    Application Fees
Registration Fees
Refund Policy on Tuition
Schedules
Late Payment Fee
     
    Application Fees
     
These fees are non-refundable.
     
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Registration Fees
 
    These fees are non-refundable unless a specific course for which a student has registered moves its scheduled time or day or is canceled altogether. In such cases, the student may withdraw from the class with a I00% deposit refund for the specific class(es) in question or may transfer the deposit to another course.
     
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Refund Policy on Tuition
 
   

Refunds for dropped classes will be made as follows.

  1. All tuition refunds will be made less the Registration Fee.
  2. A $25 drop fee will be added for each class dropped after registration.
  3. All tuition refunds will be made based on the scheduled payment due dates.
  4. All payments required by the due date will be non-refundable and will represent an obligation due the school if not paid.
  5. All pre-paid tuition in excess of the amount required at each due date less the registration and drop fee will be 100% refundable.
  6. All course tuition payments will be 100% refundable for any course which is canceled by CLPS. For any class which is moved to a different time-slot, parents have the option to either receive a full refund or select another class at that time.
     
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Schedules
 
    There will be a $25 fee to switch classes after the Registration Fee is paid. There will be no fee to add additional classes if available. (CLPS will charge no fee if we cancel a class or change class times.)
     
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Late Payment Fee
 
    Tuition payments made after their scheduled due dates are subject to a $25.00 late payment fee regardless of the total amount of the tuition payment.
     
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    Daily Procedures:
    Arrival and Pickup Procedures
Lunch
Parking
Visitors
Facilities Use
Student Medical Emergency Procedures
Medication Policy
School-Home Communication
Inclement Weather
Field Trip Guideline
     
    Arrival and Pickup Procedures
 
   

ARRIVAL:
Please plan to arrive at least 5 minutes but no more than 15 minutes before the scheduled class time. Please wait quietly in the foyer until previous classes have been dismissed.

Except for times of inclement weather, students arriving for the first period class between 8:15 and 8:25 AM wait outside the school foyer until 8:25 AM when the student shall be allowed to proceed to their classroom. During inclement weather, the student will enter the building and proceed directly to their classroom.
Students who arrive more than 15 minutes before their scheduled class shall be escorted to study hall and a $25 fee will be added to the family invoice.

ATTENTION: K-6TH PARENTS
Except for 1st period arrival as described above, please bring your children into the foyer upon ARRIVAL.

PICK-UP:
Any students not picked up within 15 minutes after the end of their last class will be escorted to study hall and a $25 fee will be added to the family invoice.

2nd Grade Monday/Wednesday
Parents will pick up their students from their last period class.

K Through 6th Grade Tuesday/Thursday
Students dismissed before the last period of the day will wait quietly in the school foyer until their parents arrive. Parents must enter the school to pick up their children.

7th Through 12th Grade Monday/Wednesday/Friday
Non-driving students dismissed before the last period of the day will wait quietly in the school foyer until their parents arrive.

Non-driving students dismissed at the last period of the day will wait outside for pick-up with a school staff member present. During times of inclement weather students will wait inside the school.

Each family will be required to submit a school form with a list of persons who may pick-up your children. We will not release your child to anyone without permission.

     
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Lunch
 
   

Students may bring a sack lunch and a drink to be carried in their back pack until lunch time (refrigeration is not available). Microwave ovens are available only for students attending on M/W/F. Occasionally, students will have the option to order fast food (i.e. McDonalds, Subway).

DISMISSAL:
Tuesday/Thursday Teachers & Students:
Students will be escorted to the lunch room by their 2nd period teacher. Upon arrival to the lunch room, students shall sit quietly until all of the students have arrived and a prayer of blessing has been offered.

Monday/Wednesday/Friday Students & Teachers:
Students will be dismissed by their 3rd period teacher to proceed directly to the lunch room. All students, including those attending class in the lower level class rooms, shall exit quietly through the front doors of the school. A teacher will be assigned each day to watch the students as they cross the school parking lot to the lunch room.

Those students who drive their own vehicles are permitted to eat lunch off campus. Only the student driving the vehicle is permitted to go off campus for lunch. Additional student passengers are not permitted. The student driver is permitted to purchase lunch for other students to eat in the lunch room during the lunch period.

     
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Parking
 
    Students must park on the upper parking lot near the worship center.
     
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Visitors
 
   

During school hours, all visitors and guests (including parents) must register through the school office. Individuals, including parents, who wish to visit classes must first obtain the approval of the administration and a visitor's sticker which must be worn at all times while on campus. Teachers should receive authorized visitors courteously but should not allow them to interrupt regular classroom procedures. The school's office policy on visitors reads as follows:

Only CLPS students will be allowed on campus unless permission has been granted by the Administration.

By its very nature, Christian Life Preparatory School encourages a high level of parental participation in education. However, in order to enhance both student safety and operational efficiency, Christian Life Preparatory School has adopted the following guidelines governing the presence of visitors on the campus during regular school operating hours (8:30 AM-4:00 PM on school days). For the purposes of this policy, "visitors" are defined as all individuals other than staff or students (on their respective class days) present in any part of the buildings other than the front offices or on the
grounds other than the normal student loading area.

  1. All visitors should call the office before coming to the school to secure permission to be in one of the restricted areas, which are essentially all areas of the campus, either inside or outside of the building, other than the front offices and the normal delivery and student loading areas, such as the front walk and the parking areas adjacent to it.
  2. All visitors much check in with the office staff upon arriving at the campus. Visitors must identify themselves, explain their intended business, and indicate how long they expect to be on campus. A written record of this
    information will be kept.
  3. All visitors must be willing to comply with all rules and regulations governing student and/or staff conduct, including the appropriate dress regulations (variances for legitimate and honorable reasons may be granted, but only if the individual(s) concerned secure permission in (advance).
  4. Any lunch time visitors must be accompanied by a school parent. Anyone failing to abide by these provisions may be denied access to any and all restricted areas or be required to leave the campus. Persons having no legitimate connection with the school or reason for being present on the school campus will be expected to leave immediately.
     
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Facilities Use
 
    The facilities used by CLPS belong to Christ-Life Church and should be respected as such. All faculty members should promote the development of good stewardship among both staff and students by demonstrating, encouraging, and if necessary, enforcing a respect for the property of others. Any proposed use of the facilities beyond that required and
established for normal operations must be approved by the administration, and may incur the payment of reasonable fees or charges.
     
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Student Medical Emergency Procedures
 
    In the event of a medical emergency the administrator, or the person acting in her absence, will be responsible for the necessary decisions regarding medical attention. The entire school staff, as a part of their in-service training, will be made aware of the school's medical emergency procedures and the nearest hospital location.
     
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Medication Policy
 
   

Medication may be administered to students on campus only under the following conditions:

  1. A determination by school officials is made that it would be appropriate to give acetaminophen to a student who displays symptoms that warrant acetaminophen usage. Acetaminophen may, however, only be administered to students whose parents have signed an acetaminophen permission form with the school, and only in strict accordance to acetaminophen labeling instructions.
  2. The student has doctor-prescribed medicine in a labeled container showing the student's name, medication, and dosage. All such prescriptions are to remain in the school's medicine cabinet or refrigerator whichever is appropriate. Students are allowed to keep asthma inhalers with them during school hours.
     
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School-Home Communication
 
    Communication between the school and the home are vital in any healthy academic setting, but because we function in something of a team-teaching situation with the parents, they are especially important in the University-Model School. Besides the usual channels of communication utilized by almost all schools, CLPS has devised other methods, such as assignment sheets, to enhance the quality and clarity of school-home communications. All members of the school community are encouraged and expected to make proper and ongoing use of any communication methods the school
may devise, in accordance with any relevant school guidelines.
     
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Inclement Weather
 
    In case of poor weather conditions, please check RenWeb or your local news station for instructions about school closure or delay.
     
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Field Trip Guideline
 
   
  1. At least two adult chaperones must be present on any school-sponsored field trips (only one chaperone is allowed with administrative approval).
  2. There must be a minimum of 1 adult chaperone for every 10 students on a CLPS field trip.
  3. All drivers and chaperones must be at least 25 years old (at least 21 with administrative approval) or be paid staff members of CLPS.
  4. Non-staff drivers and chaperones will be utilized only when requested by the administration. Individuals selected for these purposes must always have administrative approval.
  5. No student may participate in an CLPS sponsored field trip unless the chaperones have the following signed by the student's parent or guardian:
    1. a medical treatment release form
    2. permission slip to participate (which includes any school transportation that might be involved).
  6. Any use of school assets must be approved by the school's administration.
  7. All students, drivers, and chaperones must abide by the stricter of
    1. the state's seat belt laws or
    2. the standards of the driver regarding the use of seat belts.
  8. Each school vehicle used for a field trip must carry a first aid kit.
  9. Students shall not share medication. All prescription medications must be in their original containers and properly labeled, and must remain under the control of approved school representatives, who will administer them according to the instructions given on the label.
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Download the Handbook
You can download the entire handbook. The file is in .pdf format and is 1.06MB so please allow time for download.
 
Student Handbook Acknowledgement Form
Once you have read the handbook be sure to fill out and turn in the acknowledgement form.
 
Christian Life Preparatory School| 6250 S. Freeway | Fort Worth, TX 76134 | (817)293-1500